Milan Fashion Week F/W 2017: Embroidered & Retro

Milan Fashion Week Fall Winter 2017-2018 or as originally called Milano Moda Donna, is currently developing a wide set of design diversity with concepts rooted in very different moods and scenarios.

Milan programmed diverse directions unto its fashion compass, from a retro vision of what the future could look like to contemporary cuts following London’s loose and embroidering illustrated motifs- all over capes, bags and coats- with flora and fauna offering also a heterogeneous depiction of illustrations, sometimes baroque, romantic, or with an aura colored by ancient Asian textile designs.

Gucci was the first to set itself atop of the trend, dominating the culturally enriched confections with a collection highly feminine feeding vastly the brand’s hunger for the old times and heading the retro vibe also sported by rival Prada, both exploring and exploding a heavy aesthetic inspired in the 60’s and 70’s. This time overflowing folk inspirations from different sides of the world, flowers and sequins shimmered in the pieces that sparkled with silhouettes beautifully structured following the figure while presuming heavy fabrics and strong conceptual textures. It is obviously an smart marketing choice to have statement pieces, as much as possible, in order for the key audience to buy in-your-face products easily recognizable as made by the Italian luxury house.

Gucci was the first to set itself atop of the trend, dominating the culturally enriched confections with a highly feminine collection feeding the brand’s vast hunger for the old times and headlining the retro vibe also sported by rival Prada, both exploring and exploding a heavy aesthetic inspired in the 60’s and 70’s. This time overflowing with folk inspirations from different sides of the world, flowers and sequins shimmered through the pieces that sparkled with silhouettes, all beautifully structured adjusting to the human figure while exhibiting heavy fabrics and strong formal and informal textures. It is obviously a smart marketing choice to have as many statement pieces as possible, in order for the key audience to buy in-your-face products easily recognizable as made by the Italian luxury house.

But running loose in regard to prints and cuts wasn’t the rule during the Italian event, Francesco Scognamiglio bet for the same feminine alchemy that Gucci went for, but with a really different rhythm, frills swished in the catwalk leaning some volume to lines strictly following the famed figure while avoiding any skin-tight effect. Lightweight sheers were ordered to hug the body by playing with illumination; besides the frills streamlining movement, mix and matched prints were the stylish option to summon a chic effect for the collection.

Alberta Ferretti casted a spell on its fabrics that blossomed with life of their own with artistic prints, setting the pace for a half-aristocrat half-sorceress womenswear presentation. Details were concise but also propositional and reminiscent of periods in time that flew from three different master lines of design: color and bold use of lines, the use of gold embroidery for some upper-class vibes and hugging lightweight fabrics remembering the floral details in painting for a exquisitely feminine romance.

N. 21 went for a retro silhouette, also by the preferred mix and match of Milan, with a stylish version of a wardrobe made for a girl in the musicals coming right out from office and ready to sing the blues away; patterns and desaturated tones were the accompanying instruments to the song.

Other trends seen were the proposed by Annakiki, who also opted to use a retro infused collection but according to its presentation based in futuristic styles preserved by old sci-fis. Voluminous shoulders played with color and textures emphasizing the concept that also served some glossy hair and metallic shades in makeup.

Milan’s first day trends were followed by eclectic prints and sculpted coats, as in our latest article. Follow FashionWeek.com for more live reviews of Italian fashion.

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